Evangelicals, Liturgy, and Confessionalism – Oxymoron or Historical Reality?

March 5, 2009

Over at the Christian History Blog, Chris Armstrong has written an excellent short piece called “Evangelicalism’s Hidden Liturgical and Confessional Past.” In it he notes how some evangelicals today are moving to recover their liturgical and confessional history and that some are very wary of this “re-engagement.” The post helpfully shows how modern evangelicalism clearly comes out of a liturgical and confessional past and how re-engagement with this past could seriously help the movement today.

I for one would love to see more confessionalism in evangelicalism and especially more formal liturgy in our churches. I think we have lost much in the free church movement when we abandonend formal liturgy for a more “haphazard” approach.


“Listening to the Past – Lessons from Andrew Fuller” 16

October 21, 2007

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Since I am doing what I promised to do on Saturday’s I better do what I promised to do on Sundays too! So, here again is our weekly lesson from the great Baptist theologian, Andrew Fuller!

This following portion is taken from The Works of Andrew Fuller, I:111. In this passage, Fuller is warning about the dangers of blindly following tradition without letting Scripture be our foundation and guide. He uses a farming analogy to prove his point.

“My father was a farmer, and in my younger days it was one great boast among the ploughmen that they could plough a strait line across the furrows or ridges of a field. I thought I could do this as well as any of them. One day, I saw such a line, which had just been drawn, and I thought, ‘Now I have it.’ Accordingly, I laid hold of the plough, and putting one of the horses in the furrow which had been made, I resolved to keep him walking in it, and thus secure a parallel line. By and by, however, I observed that there were what might be called wriggles in this furrow; and, when I came to them, they turned out to be larger in mine than in the original. On perceiving this, I threw the plough aside, and determined never to be an imitator.”